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Fourth Annual
"Digital Salon Exhibition"

at The School of Visual Arts Gallery, 209 E. 23rd Street, NYC, Nov. 1996



The gallery works can be divided into three categories: digital prints, digital programs, and digitally controlled sculpture. Although the public generally assumes "computer art" refers to digital prints, to me this is only the beginning of digital art's possibilities. Among these prints I liked, "Subway & Body Parts #3- Desire," by Melanie St. James, Petra Karadimas' "Jimmy," and Victor Acevedo's "The Violinist," which created a forced perspective of mechanical forms, imparting a 3-D quality suggesting the relationship between music and mathematics.

Computer programs allow interaction, hence they distinguish computer art in a way prints can't. Philip George's layered images are among the most compelling computer art, and they were here tastefully animated by Ralph Wayment's programming. Also intriguing was Youn Lee's, "The Land of Time."

Most successful in a gallery setting were the computer sculptures. Chuck Genco's "Eye Box," was notable. From inside a beautifully crafted wood and brass box a glass eye randomly blinked its mechanical eyelid. On the inside of the cover: Ptolemy's map of the solar system. The eye perhaps contemplated progress toward a helio-centric view.

More ambitious was Peter Terezakis' "Rubaiyat." This grid of patinated electrical boxes and conduit was intended to vary the multi-layered sound it generated in response to viewer movement. It was hard to discern the tonal changes produced by any particular motion, but the fact that one wanted to experience the interaction suggests the potential power of digital sculptures.



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